Archive for December, 2003

Monster’s Ball DVD

The Grotowski home is not the house that love built. Three generations of Grotowski men live under the same roof, but they’re not really a family. There’s patriarch Buck (Peter Boyle), who laments he’s so old he “can’t even remember what a woman smells like.” His son Hank (Billy Bob Thornton) has been raised to follow in his father’s loveless and prejudiced footsteps. Read the rest of this entry »

Films Review January

THE BANGER SISTERS (R)

In Cameron Crowe’s “Almost Famous,” Kate Hudson, daughter of actress Goldie Hawn, plays a 1970’s rock and roll groupie, excuse me, a Band Aid, named Penny Lane. Because “Almost Famous” took place in the moment, we only got to see a small sliver of Lane’s life. Read the rest of this entry »

Too Much Sleep

In the new Shooting Gallery dramedy “Too Much Sleep,” Marc Palmieri plays a night security guard named Jack Crawford whose gun is stolen on the bus ride home. The gun means a lot to Jack. It was a revolver his father left him. Normally the theft would be a case for the police, but since the gun is unregistered, Jack must find the gun himself. Read the rest of this entry »

Seabiscuit

Underdogs and dreamers, compelled by adversity, hardship and heartbreak, race to the finish line in “Seabiscuit,” a nostalgic tale of heroism, hope and history that emerges as a thoroughbred of summer movies. Read the rest of this entry »

Good Morning, Vietnam

By the time Robin Williams arrived in Thailand to film Barry Levinson’s “Good Morning, Vietnam,” his film career was in full swing. Having jumped from the lightning-in-a-bottle television show “Mork & Mindy” to the big screen, Williams proved that through thick and thin he can deliver the goods. Read the rest of this entry »

Wrongfully Accused

Some would argue that the “obvious humor” movie spoof began with “Airplane” in 1980, but the real culprit is 1977’s “Kentucky Fried Movie.” If the irreverent humor of both films seems familiar, it’s because both films were written by the same team, Jerry and David Zucker, and Jim Abrahams. Read the rest of this entry »

Saving Grace

“Saving Grace” strives to be one of those cute, charming foreign imports like “The Full Monty” and “Waking Ned Devine.” It’s set in a picturesque Cornish village, and features a colorful gallery of characters who do unexpected things. Read the rest of this entry »

Sahara

Dashing heroes, feisty heroines, slimy villains, wisecracking sidekicks, things that explode, Sahara travels a familiar action movie road map, a by-the-numbers adventure which filters every frame through a nostalgic prism. All that sparkle can’t hide the fact Sahara feels like yesterday’s news. Read the rest of this entry »

The Flintstones

While on it’s rocky road to the big screen, director Steven Spielberg made it clear that the only way his company was going to make a live-action version of the popular animated series “The Flintstones” was if actor John Goodman played Fred Flintstones. Read the rest of this entry »

Films review December

AN EVENING WITH KEVIN SMITH (Not Rated)
(Columbia-TriStar)
BALLISTICS: ECKS VS. SERVER (R)
(Warner)
BUYING THE COW (R)
(Columbia-TriStar) Read the rest of this entry »

Blood Work DVD

If ever a movie was in need of a transfusion, it’s the new Clint Eastwood thriller “Blood Work.” Based on the best-selling novel by Michael Connelly, “Blood Work” suffers from an iron poor screenplay and anemic direction. The movie feels as bored and tired as Eastwood looks. Read the rest of this entry »

The Count of Monte Cristo

In 1814, just off the coast of Elba, shipmates and best friends Edmond Dantes (Jim Caviezel) and Fernand Mondego (Guy Pearce) help escort their ailing captain to shore seeking help. Even though their captain dies, Dantes and Mondego get to meet exiled French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte, who asks Dantes to secretly deliver a confidential letter for him. Read the rest of this entry »