Archive for August, 2000

American Psycho

Patrick Bateman is handsome, well educated and intelligent. He is twenty-seven and living his own American dream. He works by day on Wall Street, earning a fortune to complement the one he was born with Read the rest of this entry »

Final Destination

When a boy starts having a premonition of Flight 180 crashing, he tells his friends before they board that it is a bad idea and to not to take the flight. His friends listen to him and don’t go and soon after the plane crashes. Now since his friends didn’t get on the plane one by one they are getting killed in mysterious ways Read the rest of this entry »

The Sweet Hereafter

Director-writer Atom Egoyan’s somber drama about the meltdown of a small town after a tragic school bus accident was one of 1997’s best films. Based on the novel by Russell Banks, Egoyan’s screenplay is a bittersweet affair, but tackled with conviction and honesty, it emerges as a touching portrait of the human spirit. Read the rest of this entry »

Progeny

If ever a film begged for an alien anal probe, it’s “Progeny.” Make it deep and long, because there’s nothing else here that is even remotely as interesting. Read the rest of this entry »

Gone in Sixty Seconds

Car theft in Long Beach went down 47% when Randall “Memphis” Raines walked away from the life. He gets dragged back into it by assuming the job his brother Kip screwed up for stolen-car broker Raymond Calitri: steal 50 exotic cars and have them on a container ship by 8 AM Friday morning, and he got this news on a Monday. With Calitri threatening to kill him and Kip, and the police GRAB unit breathing down his neck, Memphis reassembles his old crew and attempts to pull off the logistically impossible Read the rest of this entry »

Butterfly

Told with the assurance of a master storyteller, “Butterfly” unfolds like a spirited novel where you can’t wait to turn the page, even if you know where the story is going. Director Jose Luis Cuerda, working from a thoughtful screenplay by Rafael Azcona, delivers a heartfelt and honest story about one boy’s coming-of-age. Read the rest of this entry »

Films Review September

ANY GIVEN SUNDAY (R)

When he’s not busy trying to impress us with his camerawork or confuse us with his conspiracy paranoia, director Oliver Stone remains a potent visionary. Stone perfectly captures the hope and desperation of major league football with this winning drama about players both on and off the field. Read the rest of this entry »

Texas chainsaw massacre-special edition

“The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” is the perfect drive-in movie. That’s where I, and I’m sure millions of others, first saw it. I’ve never seen a decent print of the film. As a matter of fact, the print they used at the drive-in was so worn and faded that I first thought the film was in black and white. The new Pioneer Special Edition DVD of “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” looks like a different film altogether. Read the rest of this entry »

Prison of the Dead

Kristof, an eccentric rich kid, tricks his high school friends into getting back together for a reunion of sorts, under the pretense of a funeral. The group of twenty-somethings is forced to spend the night in an old abandoned witches’ prison. During a Ouija Board séance, the schoolmates accidentally unearth three dead executioners from their graves Read the rest of this entry »

Practical Magic

Except for “The Wizard of Oz,” films about witches haven’t been able to cast a magical spell at the box office. There have been good witches and bad witches, witches from Eastwick and sorority witches. Read the rest of this entry »

Smokey And The Bandit

Smokey and the Bandit didn’t start the non-stop car chase craze that followed in it’s wake. Hal Needham’s 1977 action-comedy came a full year after Roger Corman and American International Pictures delivered “Cannonball,” “Eat My Dust” and “The Gumball Rally,” and two years after “Death Race 2000.” Thanks to the star power of Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, and Jackie Gleason, “Smokey and the Bandit” took the genre mainstream, leaping from triple bills at the local drive-in to major box office revenue. Read the rest of this entry »

Gangland

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The blues brothers – collector’s edition

They’re not the police. They’re musicians. They’re on a mission from God, and will do whatever it takes to fulfill that mission. In “The Blues Brothers,” that includes trashing half of Chicago, including a shopping mall, the Daley Center and about one-hundred police cars. “The Blues Brothers” is marvelous mayhem, one outrageous stunt or gag after the other. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sweet Hereafter

Director-writer Atom Egoyan’s somber drama about the meltdown of a small town after a tragic school bus accident was one of 1997’s best films. Based on the novel by Russell Banks, Egoyan’s screenplay is a bittersweet affair, but tackled with conviction and honesty, it emerges as a touching portrait of the human spirit. Ian Holm is sensational as lawyer Mitchell Stephens, who descends on the small town immediately following the accident. His presence and claims of retribution empower some while distancing others. Fighting demons of his own, Stephens slowly begins to realize that not everything is picture perfect in the little town. Bruce Greenwood is outstanding as the father of two children who died in the crash, desperately trying to get on with his life. Filled with exceptional performances and honest dialogue, “The Sweet Hereafter” touches your heart and your mind. Read the rest of this entry »

Virus

Another variation on the “Ghost in the Machine” theme, this Sci-fi thriller based on the Dark Horse comic book is a moderately engaging effort. Directed with assurance by veteran effects designer John Bruno, “Virus” is a visual and special effects extravaganza, only marred by a pedestrian screenplay that seems to serve up every cliche known to the genre. Read the rest of this entry »