Archive for January, 1999

The Big Lebowski

Like a rabid pit bull in heat, “The Big Lebowski” goes right for the jugular. It’s a ferociously funny comedy that dares to be different. It’s no surprise that this collage of calamity comes from Joel and Ethan Coen, the dynamic duo whose last film was “Fargo.” “The Big Lebowski” harkens back to the brother’s “Raising Arizona,” a wild, free-for-all comedy with a gallery of bizarre characters and dizzying cinematography. Read the rest of this entry »

American Beauty

It wasn’t love at first sight. It was lust. When he first saw her, she was more than the nubile 17 year-old best friend of his daughter. She was a goddess, capable of stopping time so that a moment with her would seem like eternity. Her lips were full and red, her young body tight and firm.
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Films Review February

BRIDE OF CHUCKY (R)

You can’t keep a good killer doll down. Just when you thought the “Chucky” franchise had worn down for the last time, the latest installment breathes new life into the formula. I mean, any film that kills John Ritter not once but twice has my vote for best film of the year (Next time John don’t be so rude to your fans). Read the rest of this entry »

Blast from the Past

Brandon Fraser is Adam Weber, the child of an eccentric inventor and his wife. Following a bomb scare in the 1960s that locked the Webers in their bomb shelter for 35 years, Adam Weber must venture out into Los Angeles and obtain food and supplies for his family, and a non-mutant wife for himself. He meets Eve (Alicia Silverstone), who reluctantly agrees to help him out Read the rest of this entry »

Video reviews

[BETTER THAN CHOCOLATE, CORRUPT, DANCE WITH THE DEVIL, DESERT BLUE, DUDLEY DO-RIGHT,MICKEY BLUE EYES, UNIVERSAL SOLDIER: THE RETURN, YOU KNOW MY NAME][THE ADVENTURES OF ELMO IN GROUCHLAND, AMERICAN PIE, BABAR: KING OF THE ELEPHANTS,K-911, MADE MEN, PRINCE & THE SURFER, RUN LOLA RUN, SUMMER OF SAM, SUPER COP 2, Read the rest of this entry »

The Great Train Robbery

After “Westworld” and “Coma,” writer-director Michael Crichton tackled this elaborate period piece about the great train robbery of England in 1855. Based on his best-selling novel which took extensive dramatic license, “The Great Train Robbery” tells the tale of three men who conspire to steal a gold shipment off a moving train destined for France. Read the rest of this entry »

Top Gun

Tom Cruise didn’t know it at the time, but “Top Gun” was the second film in the Tom Cruise-military uniform theory of success. It started with “Taps.” It continued with “Top Gun,” then “Born on the Fourth of July,” and finally “A Few Good Men.” Every time Cruise puts on a military uniform, he’s box office gold. Read the rest of this entry »

Mummy, The

In ancient Egypt, high priest Imhotep started a forbidden relationship with Anck Su Namun, Pharaoh Seti’s Mistress. When Seti finds out about what’s going on, Imhotep and his loved one stab him, but can’t escape the trustworthy guards: Anck Su Namnun chooses to commit suicide while Imhotep is bestowed with the Hom-Dai, the most feared curse of all: He is mummified alive in Hamunaptra, the city of the Dead. More than thirty-six centuries later, in 1923, to be exact, adventurer Rick leads Egyptologist Evelyn and her brother Johnathan to mysterious Hamunaptra Read the rest of this entry »

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

In Jersey City, an African American hit man follows “Hagakure: The Way of the Samurai.” He lives alone, in simplicity with homing pigeons for company, calling himself Ghost Dog. His master, who saved his life eight years ago, is part of the local mob Read the rest of this entry »

Entrapment

Following the theft of a highly-secured piece of artwork, an agent convinces her insurance agency employers to allow her to wriggle into the company of an aging but active master thief. Connery’s burglar takes her on suspiciously and demands rigorous training before their first job together—stealing a highly-valued mask from a chichi party. Their deepening attraction and distrust could tear apart their partnership but the promise of a bigger prize (some eight billion odd dollars) by Zeta-Jones keeps the game interesting Read the rest of this entry »

Robocop

“Robocop” was Dutch director Paul Verhoeven’s first American film. What a debut. Filled with ultra- violent images and a comic book sensibility, “Robocop” immediately caught America’s fancy. Released in 1987, “Robocop” is set in the not-so-distant future of the late 1990’s. Read the rest of this entry »

Eyes Wide Shut

Sexual jolts disrupt Manhattan physician Bill Harford’s equilibrium. At an elegant Christmas party, two “models” hit on him, he watches a Lothario try to pick up his tipsy wife, he aids a woman sprawled naked in a bathroom after an overdose. The next night, his wife reveals sexual fantasies with a stranger; a dead patient’s daughter throws herself at him; as he walks, brooding, six teen boys hurl homophobic insults at him; a streetwalker takes him to her flat; he interrupts men having a sex party with a girl barely in her teens Read the rest of this entry »

Films review January

BARBERSHOP (PG-13)

SIGNS (PG-13)

(Touchstone) Read the rest of this entry »

Fight Club

You’re young. You have an easy, well-paid deskjob. You have a condo, Swedish furniture, artistic coffee tables and a fridge full of condiments Read the rest of this entry »

Day of the Dead

I remember the first time that I saw George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead.” I was a junior in high school, and was trying to get over a bout with pneumonia. It was 1974, and the first time that television was going to show the film in it’s complete, uncut version. My bed was by a wall with the window in it, and a storm was brewing outside. Read the rest of this entry »